McCain opposes economic stimulus package
David Edwards and Jeremy Gantz
Published: Sunday January 25, 2009


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With just one word -- "no" -- Sen. John McCain made clear that President Obama and his Democratic allies face an uphill battle getting the much heralded $825 billion stimulus package passed.

Asked by Fox's Chris Wallace whether he could vote for the package as currently proposed, Obama's former -- and current -- foe said: "No... We're going to lay an additional $2 trillion of debt on future Americans. Is there going to be a point where foreign countries such as the Chinese stop buying our debt? Look, we've got to eliminate the unnecessary spending."

The Arizona senator's comments are something of an about-face. Just two over two weeks ago, on Jan. 9th, McCain appeared on a different Fox News program, declaring his interest in further government spending and willingness to work with Obama.

But although McCain said then that "unusual action is required in these most unusual times," he seems to have returned to the fiscal conservatism near the center of his presidential campaign.

The former GOP president nominee also said on "Fox News Sunday" that he wants to make permanent the Bush tax cuts, which helped high-earning people. President Obama has said he would not seek to renew them when they expire next year.

McCain told Wallace he would like to "sit down and negotiate" with Obama and other Democrats rather than filibuster the massive stimulus measure, but the lifelong Republican still calls himself a member of the loyal opposition, the Associated Press reported.

"So far, as far as I can tell, no Republican proposal has been incorporated," he told Wallace.

McCain's comments are sure to worry Obama, who said Saturday that he expects to sign the stimulus bill into law in less than a month.

This video is from Fox's Fox News Sunday, broadcast Jan. 25, 2009.




Download video via RawReplay.com



 
 


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